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April 2012
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June 2012

May 2012 Expands Team By Bringing Marketing and Product Development Expert Aboard, the premier Career Network focused on helping people grow and succeed professionally, today announced the hiring of John Krautzel as Director of Marketing. With more than 11 years of online marketing experience, Mr. Krautzel has a successful track record of understanding audience needs and translating them to successful product initiatives. In this role, Mr. Krautzel will be spearheading’s new consumer product development initiatives. 

“We are thrilled that John has joined our team,” said Joe Weinlick, Vice President of Marketing for  “We have a mission to develop products and services to help people manage and get ahead in their careers, and John is the ideal person to lead this program.  He brings a unique insight when it comes to professional audiences and how they engage online. Working with John—someone who has been on the front lines in cultivating effective digital relationships—will be critical as we build future products and continue to grow our online communities.”

Formerly an 11-year veteran with, a network of online communities of experienced professionals, Mr. Krautzel specializes in building knowledge-sharing communities that allow professionals to collaborate with their peers to solve workplace challenges and manage their careers.  This in-depth perception of collaborative professional relationships will be essential as continues to expand its portfolio of career management services.

While at, Mr. Krautzel held various positions including: Associate Director of Marketing and Client Services, Senior Marketing Manager, and Search Engine Marketing Specialist.  Prior to joining he worked for Pilot Freight Services as a Customer Service Specialist coordinating customer needs to 75 satellite offices across the globe.  Mr. Krautzel holds a Bachelors degree in Business Management from West Chester University.

The Death of the Cubicle Has Made My Coworkers Ruder

Yesterday, I read two separate articles about the death of the cubicle and how forward thinking executives (particularly those hip execs in Silicon Valley) are cultivating collaborative workspaces by knocking down those dated cubicle walls. 

While I love looking at pictures of innovative workplaces, I don’t think I could work in one.  No doubt it would be fun at first, but I get distracted easily and working in an open environment at a table, on a couch, or in a hanging chair—I think my productivity would take a hit. 

Don’t get me wrong, I love the idea of those cubicle walls tumbling down. I just don’t know if I’m ready to give them up completely.  Right now I sit in an open collaborative environment with pony walls (those half cubicle walls), but even they bring their own set of problems—everyone hears each other’s conversations, talking on the phone is annoying to colleagues, and headphones are a MUST.  In fact I read in the NY Times that headphones are the new cubicle wall and I couldn’t agree more. 

If you look around our office floor you’ll see that about 75% of us wear headphones at some point during the day.  When you sit with 30 people in an open space they're sometimes the only way you can get anything done—even if they’re not dispensing any music. 

However, my one big complaint about not having a traditional cubicle is that my coworkers’ manners seem to have fallen by the wayside.  Because I don’t have a door or high walls, teammates are constantly approaching my workspace and diving right into their questions—there’s no “How ya doin’?”, “Do you have a minute?” or “Can I ask you a quick question?” Because they’ve seen me sitting at my desk while they made their 20-foot approach, they assume I saw them coming my way and am ready to converse.  But in reality, I most likely had no idea you were walking towards my desk because I have my noise canceling headphones on. So even though I’m out on the floor like a sitting duck, make sure you preface your question with “Do you have a minute?” It’s just the polite thing to do.

As for the death of the cubicle, I think we still have a ways to go before I’m sitting in a hanging chair examining the latest employment trends—figure out the noise distraction issue first and then we’ll talk.

The BLS Numbers Are Out But What Did the Career Network See This Month?

Today’s the day, the day that all focus turns to jobs.  How many jobs were added in the previous month? Was the needle moved on the unemployment rate? Which industries are adding opportunities? And what does this all mean for our current economic outlook?

Today the numbers showed that employment rose by 115,000 in April and the unemployment rate was little changed at 8.1 percent. Which is what we thought we’d see—unemployment relatively unchanged.   Employment increased in professional and business services, retail trade, and health care, but declined in transportation and warehousing.

So that’s what the BLS says, but what are we at seeing?  True the number of jobs posted on the Career Network won’t result in immediate jobs added to the economy, but we can help predict what we should expect in the months to come.

Opportunities Posted As Compared to March

When compared to last month we've seen a 2% decrease in the total number of jobs posted in April 2012 when compared to the number of job opportunities posted in March.  However, when compared to the number of opportunities posted to the Career Network last year at this time opportunities are up by 236%.  While it is great that jobs are up, we’re not seeing jobs grow as aggressively as many would like, but thoughtful growth is important—if corporations grow too fast that could lead to issues down the road.

For those college graduates entering the workforce in the next few months, more than 52% of jobs posted to our network are entry-level positions, which is a promising sign.

Industries That Are Growing
As for the industries that we’ve seen the most growth occur since March?  They are Customer Service, Hospitality (as we prepare for summer months), and Media & Communications.

Where The Jobs Are
The question we get most—where are the jobs at? Well, when looking at the total number of opportunities posted to the Career Network, the most jobs were located in the New York metropolitan area, however that’s just based on total jobs.  When you compare the total number of jobs posted in relation to the number of available workers (Civilian Labor Force) in a specific metropolitan area—the most opportunities are actually in San Jose, CA, Bloomington, IL, and Columbus, IN.

So that’s what we saw in April, while job growth was slow, we hope we’ll see some pickup as college grads emerge on the scene.